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Information for Homeowners


How to Begin

The first step is to establish whether the source of poor air quality in your home is mold. Have you had:
• Recurrent water leaks, burst pipes, HVAC leaks, a wet basement, etc.?
• Water stains on walls, floors, ceilings, etc.?
• Dark discolorations on building materials?
• Musty, moldy odors?

If you answered yes to any of these questions you may wish to fill out our "Request Info" form and contact GML.


Mold Inspection Report Summary
Introduction: Describes the inspection including the location and purpose.

Inspection and Laboratory Procedures: Details all methods used in the inspection including how air, surface, and wall/ceiling cavity samples are collected, the growth medium used, and some general laboratory procedures.

Results: Explains how the data are reported and describes sample locations with the types and levels of molds found at each location. The control sample results are included here and are used for comparison with results from the areas of concern.

Explains connections between mold levels and types as well as our on-site observations. We provide easy to understand correlations between the conditions in your home or building and the mold levels and types to help you understand the extent of the mold problem, or the lack of one. There is also a general discussion in this section that details information about mold, general affects of mold exposure, and specific information about the types of molds found.

Recommendations:
Provides detailed remediation recommendations. We also offer suggestions to help prevent mold growth from occurring in the future and how to maintain a "healthier" home.


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Information for Commercial Property Owners / Managers / Tenants

How to Begin
The first step is to establish whether there may be a mold problem in an indoor environment-workplace, condominium, apartment, warehouse, etc.
Have you had:
• Tenants complaining of 'musty' or 'moldy' odors?
• Tenants complaining of illnesses only when at work?
• Recurrent water damage, flooding, leaky roofs, air conditioning   system leak, frozen/burst pipes?
• Dark discolorations or spots on building materials?
• Rotting building materials?
• Damp or humid basements?
• Forced hot air heating or central air conditioning systems?
• Water stains on walls, carpeting, ceilings?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you should fill out our "Request Info" form and contact GML. You will be contacted within 24 hours of your phone call, email, or fax correspondence.

What is a Mold Inspection?
A mold inspection includes the following:
• Detailed documentation of the history of the problem
• Visual inspection of all areas of concern
• Quantitative air, cavity (wall, floor, ceiling), and surface sampling
• Easy to understand, comprehensive report (see below)
• Follow-up phone consultation

Mold Inspection Report Summary
Introduction: Describes the inspection including the location and purpose.

Inspection and Laboratory Procedures: Details all methods used in the inspection including how air, surface, and wall/ceiling cavity samples are collected, the growth medium used, and some general laboratory procedures.

Results: Explains how the data are reported and describes sample locations with the types and levels of molds found at each location. The control sample results are included here and are used for comparison with results from the areas of concern.

Explains connections between mold levels and types as well as our on-site observations. We provide easy to understand correlations between the conditions in your home or building and the mold levels and types to help you understand the extent of the mold problem, or the lack of one. There is also a general discussion in this section that details information about mold, general affects of mold exposure, and specific information about the types of molds found.

Recommendations:
Provides detailed remediation recommendations. We also offer suggestions to help prevent mold growth from occurring in the future and how to maintain a "healthier" building.


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Recommended mold remediation companies

Steve Goselin Envirotech Clean Air, Inc.
10 Spencer Street
Stoneham, MA 02180
www.breatheasier.com
800-698-1300
Chris McDonough McDonough Environmental Services
PO Box 2791
Attleboro, MA 02763
www.moldremediationma.com
508-216-3159
Jason Mercer Advanced Cleaning & Restoration
16 Washburn Street
Worcester, MA 01610
www.advancedclean.com
508-438-0264
Otto Marenholtz ProCare
3 North Maple Street
Woburn, MA 01801
www.pro-careinc.com
781-933-7400

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Home Mold Test Kit

Surface Mold Testing

Materials Included:

•  Sterile swabs
•  Sterile, plastic test tubes
•  Sterile water in plastic test tubes
•  Sharpie Marker
•  Chain of Custody Sample Identification Form


Procedure :

Sterile materials should remain sterile (free of bacteria and mold) until you use them to collect a sample. Wearing gloves is helpful but not necessary. If visible mold is present or suspected, please use caution when collecting the sample; a face mask or other protective respiratory gear is recommended to minimize mold spore inhalation during collection.

1. Fill out the chain of custody form with all necessary information including descriptions of the sample location, material sample will be taken from, surface area tested, etc.

2. At the sample site, remove a swab, stick end first, from the package. There are two swabs in each package but only one will be needed per sample (the second one can be used for a second sample). Do not put the exposed swab down before or after you've collected the sample and hold the swab by the very end of the stick.

3. Open the sterile water tube (the cap should be placed face down on a clean surface) and dip the swab into the water. Recap the sterile water tube immediately since you may be using it to collect other samples and the water needs to remain sterile.

4. Collect the sample with the wetted swab by lightly brushing the swab on the surface. Molds on kitchen wallboard will almost certainly be different from molds on the basement floor joists, therefore, different swab samples should be collected on each surface type containing visible mold. At each site, swab different types of molds identified by different colors or textures.

5. Open an empty, clearly labeled (by you), sterile test tube and place the cap face down on a clean surface. Place the swab into the tube and gently snap the end of the swab stick off on the edge of the tube. Replace the cap.

6. When comparing contamination conditions, collect samples consistently at each site. In other words, at each site, for example, swab a 3"X3" area of the material in question.

7. Store samples in a cool place (4 ° C) and send them to the lab as soon as possible for analysis.


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